Slide background
Slide background
Slide background

Over 100,000 moms can’t be wrong. Five in a Row is a treasure to be shared!

Dedicated to protecting and nurturing the early years of childhood, Before Five in a Row opens up the world of learning through great books and creative play, and builds the solid foundation needed for more formal education to come.Learn More
Easy to use and fun to do, Five in a Row is designed to teach children the joy of learning while exposing them to the vast world of information that’s so important in building a solid educational foundation to prepare them for a life of learning.Learn More
Building on the foundation of loving learning and the joy of discovery begun in Five in a Row while upholding academic excellence, Beyond Five in a Row will encourage critical thinking and develop character growth in interpersonal relationships.Learn More

What Others are Saying

I love FIAR because it allows me to be the kind of Mom that I’ve always wanted to be – Calm, nurturing, cuddly. AND my kids learn a ton!
Can’t imagine what our life would be like without FIAR. We’ve been Rowing for 14 years! It has given us the BEST family memories, favorite recipes and a wonderful closeness we never would have had with a “school in a box” curriculum. WE LOVE FIAR!
I like FIAR because of the consistency in rereading the books and the discussions that spring from the story. Many projects to accompany each story help to bring a lesson closer to home for us.
I love FIAR for the relaxed homeschooling days we can enjoy while building relationships and loving literature. I love that my kids are four years apart and I can still teach them together! We’re on our second go ’round here and loving it more than the first time!
One of the wonderful benefits of using FIAR, in my opinion, is the pace. It is thorough, but laid back and fun at the same time.
I love snuggling next to my children reading a great piece of literature and seeing their eyes light up with excitement when we do fun activities. So much more fun than boring old textbooks! Thank You!
I love FIAR because it brings us together as a family and allows the children to develop a love of learning. The fact that it teaches critical thinking along the way is a huge benefit!

From the Blog

Broadening Your Child’s Educational Palate with FIAR

November 10th, 2015|0 Comments

From time to time I’ll hear a mother say that her child just isn’t interested in a story or her child was whining by the second or third day and didn’t want to read the book again. And sometimes a book simply will NOT connect with a child for some unknown reason. BUT . . . we live in a very, very, VERY different world than when I was five years old more than 60 years ago.

And that’s not necessarily good.

Many children today have little or no attention spans, having been anesthetized with a relentless flow of electronic entertainment. Simple illustrations and simple stories may not be the first choice of children who’ve grown accustomed to never-ending sensory overload.

One of the many beautiful attributes of FIAR is

How to Teach so a Child Falls in Love with Learning

November 2nd, 2015|0 Comments

When Jane and I began homeschooling more than thirty years ago, almost no one gave up or quit homeschooling. You began and you finished the task—at least until, if not through, high school. But in

  • learnstylesfinal

Different Learning Styles: Five in a Row Has You Covered

September 21st, 2015|2 Comments

“Look at me when I am talking to you.”

How many times have we heard a parent say that to a child? How many times have we said it to our children?

It seems like a reasonable request when we have something important to say. Whether we’re teaching a concept, issuing a warning, delivering an ultimatum, or even offering a gentle reminder, eye contact seems to seal the deal. But do children listen better or hear better if they are staring us in the eye?

Maybe not.

Many years ago, a fellow homeschool mom shared something about her son that helped me to understand my own children, which in turn, helped me to teach them better.

Diana had been frustrated with her son, David, because every time his piano teacher spoke to him, he looked away as if he couldn’t care less about what she had to say. Diana thought he was being rude and spoke to him about it—many times. It never seemed to change though. Week after week, David would turn his head when his teacher spoke to him. Diana was actually embarrassed by this behavior.